A retro boutique hotel that looks straight out of a Wes Anderson film

Dan Howarth, writing for Dezeen:

Calistoga Motor Lodge and Spa was rejuvenated by US design firm AvroKO, which has worked on hospitality projects including a “micro hotel” in New York City. Located in the town of Calistoga, in California’s Napa Valley, the building was constructed in the middle of the 20th century.

Calistoga Motor Lodge’s new interiors have a retro feel, with colours, patterns, furniture and lighting pieces all taken from the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s.

“The interiors, as well as the brand identity, gleaned inspiration from graphic moments one might encounter during mobile adventuring, such as gas stations and truck stops, faux wood panelled vehicles, sports uniforms, etc,” said a statement from the hotel, “while much of the guest experience and styling moments feature ‘analog’ leisure of decades past, such as hula hooping and jump rope.”

Unlike homes, hospitality and retail space really offer the scope to mix a number of palettes since the stay is short and memorable. Despite this (plus the graphics), AvroKO has managed to produce a warm and fairly minimal aesthetic with crisp details.

The windows of New York, illustrated

Jason Kottke:

José Guizar is a Mexican designer living in NYC with an obsession for the city’s windows. For his Windows of New York project, he’s done dozens of illustrations of all styles of window from around the city (mostly lower Manhattan).

The Windows of New York project is a illustrated fix for an obsession that has increasingly grown in me since I first moved to this city. A product of countless steps of journey through the city streets, this is a collection of windows that somehow have caught my restless eye out from the never-ending buzz of the streets. This project is part an ode to architecture and part a self-challenge to never stop looking up.

Somehow I prefer these illustrations to the ‘fancier’ architectural renderings. They are bold, crisp and (in a certain way) more relatable.

The Steve Jobs Theatre, in pictures

Even though Apple had a press event at this venue this September, it was hard to gauge the look and feel of the lobby and demo area —Recode did offer a photographic tour — due to the crowd and everyone vying to get their shots in.

Not to say that the entrance lobby space would be compromised with internal columns but it does look unbelievable to have a roof so large be supported by only the peripheral glazing members. The trick: Carbon fibre, a smart structural bracing, and pure technological progress.

Bonus: It isn’t be too evident in the pictures, but the white pads below the Apple Watches follow the curve of the table, which follow the curve of the demo room, which follow the curve of the entire theatre. Chalk that up to “immaculate attention to detail” or “plain old OCD”, as you like.

(Via Reddit)

Your daily distraction: The cutest little hedgehog goes camping, in pictures

Stella, writing for Bored Panda:

We know you remember Azuki, the tiny Japanese hedgehog who goes on big adventures. His perky ears, button nose, and delightful roundness is just impossible to forget. Well, Azuki recently traded his cozy dream house in for a set of miniature Coleman camping gear and took a trip to the great outdoors. Equipped with his own tent, kayak, and barbecue, he was all set for success, and pretty much had the time of his life. Just looking at his photos makes us want to get our camp on. It also really, really makes us want a hedgehog. Like, right this second.

Take a ride on the wild side and see the best moments from Azuki’s camping days below, and don’t even try to tell us you’ve ever been as happy as this magnificent little guy.

Nomos launches a new line of minimal (with a dash of play) automatic watches

If you’re fond of mechanical watches and not aware of Nomos, well, that’s not possible. But if you are fond of watches and don’t keep close tabs on the world of watchmaking beyond quartz, you really should keep tabs on this brand.

Cutting away from the norm and producing most of their parts in-house, including a very impressive automatic movement [what makes the watch tick], Nomos has been creating waves for their technical prowess, minimal and playful design language, and affordable price tag (in the world of mechanical timepieces; gloss over this point if you consider high-end branded quartz watches as your upper limit). For example, the series averages around $4,000 for a steel-cased watch while the special rose gold Metro watch costs around $9,700. Yes, these are still considered good value to just be in the under $5,000 category

Today they introduced their “At Work” series, which is probably just a branding term for a series which continue where their 35 mm automatic watches left off [this one is 39 mm]. If you observe their former, including the initial hand-wound watches, you’ll notice the subtle refinement in proportions, colours and nomenclature.

Not surprisingly, it’s easy to say which is my favourite — the gallery reeks of the prejudice — the rose gold Metro.

You can find their new collection on their website, but you should really just peruse the entire collection.

Delete the Date: Anti-invitations for cancelled weddings

Jessica Hische:

I love working for The New York Times, but this project for the Sunday Styles section was especially fun. I was asked to create artwork about what happens when you have to cancel your wedding. My thoughts immediately went to fancy wedding stationery, and I had a lot of fun both writing and designing these fake anti-invitations.

Family house in Japan centred on an indoor garden

Eleanor Gibson, writing for Dezeen:

This family house in Japan’s Shiga prefecture was designed by local studio Hearth Architects around an indoor garden, which is planted with a tree that extends towards a skylight.

To make the most of this sunny spot, the architects created a double-height void for an indoor garden.

The tall rough rendered walls around the garden provide the residents with privacy from the street, with two openings that offer natural ventilation.

The inner walls of the garden are also fitted with openings to offer views from the spaces inside towards the garden and access to daylight.

As the deciduous tree sheds its leaves in the winter it will allow more light into the residence, and when it flourishes in the summer it will offer shade.

Not to skimp over the immaculate craftsmanship or beautiful material palette, but what draws me to this house is the beautiful execution of space in this smallish apartment; of the indoor, the outdoor and the in-between.

Building a Lego CV to stand out from the other portfolios

Andy Morris, writing for Bored Panda:

Applying for jobs is a boring process that involves mountains of paperwork. This is not only tedious for the applicant, who must fill out each and every sheet while ensuring that everything looks aesthetically appealing, but can also bore the employer, who must sort through each applicant and their paperwork. Because of the tedium, standing out and creating a fresh spin on resumes and CVs has become popular. Additionally, making a creative resume can be fun for both the applicant and the employer, as it spices up the monotony of the job hunt and adds a much-needed element of fun.

My name is Andy Morris and I’m a recent design graduate from the University of South Wales who enlivened my job applications with a unique CV in the form of a LEGO minifigure. I used my design philosophy and experience with toys to create a LEGO minifigure CV that sets me apart from my peers.

President Flip Flops: Moving back-and-forth through tweets

Honestly, I don’t care if this is a product worth buying for utilitarian purposes or whether this company will be successful; I just love the idea.

The President Flip Flops is “a lighthearted poke at the political flip flops the President makes on Twitter,” available for purchase.

What I enjoy the most, is that the name itself is very suited for its function.

NICKEL-AND-DIMING ON THE CHARGING CAPABILITIES OF THE iPHONE X

An interesting titbit from the iPhone X tech specs page (also applies to the iPhone 8):

Regarding the battery:

Built-in rechargeable lithium-ion battery

Wireless charging (works with Qi chargers)

Charging via USB to computer system or power adapter

Fast-charge capable

And what is supplied in the box:

iPhone with iOS 11

EarPods with Lightning Connector

Lightning to 3.5 mm Headphone Jack Adapter

Lightning to USB Cable

USB Power Adapter

The iPhone X may be marketed as from “the future,” but in truth Apple has been pushing the boundaries of tech since a while now. The iPhone 7 omitted the headphone jack to some criticism, while now the entire MacBook line-up features only USB Type-C ports. It doesn’t matter which side of the fence you sit on, Apple is a design-centric company and in design, you have to make decisions. Maybe we aren’t there for a wireless and single-port-rule-all world yet, but that is definitely where we are headed.

What however there is no excuse for, is, delivering a compromised experience for what are arguably the most expensive tech products available.

The iPhone 7 may have shipped with a headphone adapter, but it omitted something more important, a 12-watt charger. It was capable of charging faster [not to be confused with fast charge] but most people are unaware, and most people are not going to purchase an additional brick, even if it’s a fraction of the phone itself.

The 2016 and later entire MacBook line; did not come bundled with the standard $19 power extension accessory bundled before, despite having a 15% or so higher price.

This year’s iPad Pros; ship with a 12-watt charger, capable of fast charging [which consists of boosting a device from 0 – 50% in significantly shorter period before normal speeds resume) with a 29-watt or higher USB-C output brick.

This moment’s iPhones 8 and X; capable of fast charging as well with a similar brick. Added to this, wireless charging. Let’s add something else too; it still ships with a lighting to USB-A cable.

The iPhone 8 starts at a $50 higher price than the 7 (albeit with little more storage). The iPhone X starts at $999.

$999 is the price for a phone ahead of its time, but it doesn’t get you wireless sound or connectivity inside the box. That’s extra.

Connectivity to your USB-C type MacBook? Extra.

Wired charging at 12-watt speeds? Extra. Or fast-charging (which is genuinely useful) at 29-watts? Extra.

$999 might be a psychological price-point to meet, but in all senses, I’d rather charge $1049 and give the best version of the charging accessories inside the box.

Site Footer