Nomos launches a new line of minimal (with a dash of play) automatic watches

If you’re fond of mechanical watches and not aware of Nomos, well, that’s not possible. But if you are fond of watches and don’t keep close tabs on the world of watchmaking beyond quartz, you really should keep tabs on this brand.

Cutting away from the norm and producing most of their parts in-house, including a very impressive automatic movement [what makes the watch tick], Nomos has been creating waves for their technical prowess, minimal and playful design language, and affordable price tag (in the world of mechanical timepieces; gloss over this point if you consider high-end branded quartz watches as your upper limit). For example, the series averages around $4,000 for a steel-cased watch while the special rose gold Metro watch costs around $9,700. Yes, these are still considered good value to just be in the under $5,000 category

Today they introduced their “At Work” series, which is probably just a branding term for a series which continue where their 35 mm automatic watches left off [this one is 39 mm]. If you observe their former, including the initial hand-wound watches, you’ll notice the subtle refinement in proportions, colours and nomenclature.

Not surprisingly, it’s easy to say which is my favourite — the gallery reeks of the prejudice — the rose gold Metro.

You can find their new collection on their website, but you should really just peruse the entire collection.

Delete the Date: Anti-invitations for cancelled weddings

Jessica Hische:

I love working for The New York Times, but this project for the Sunday Styles section was especially fun. I was asked to create artwork about what happens when you have to cancel your wedding. My thoughts immediately went to fancy wedding stationery, and I had a lot of fun both writing and designing these fake anti-invitations.

Family house in Japan centred on an indoor garden

Eleanor Gibson, writing for Dezeen:

This family house in Japan’s Shiga prefecture was designed by local studio Hearth Architects around an indoor garden, which is planted with a tree that extends towards a skylight.

To make the most of this sunny spot, the architects created a double-height void for an indoor garden.

The tall rough rendered walls around the garden provide the residents with privacy from the street, with two openings that offer natural ventilation.

The inner walls of the garden are also fitted with openings to offer views from the spaces inside towards the garden and access to daylight.

As the deciduous tree sheds its leaves in the winter it will allow more light into the residence, and when it flourishes in the summer it will offer shade.

Not to skimp over the immaculate craftsmanship or beautiful material palette, but what draws me to this house is the beautiful execution of space in this smallish apartment; of the indoor, the outdoor and the in-between.

Building a Lego CV to stand out from the other portfolios

Andy Morris, writing for Bored Panda:

Applying for jobs is a boring process that involves mountains of paperwork. This is not only tedious for the applicant, who must fill out each and every sheet while ensuring that everything looks aesthetically appealing, but can also bore the employer, who must sort through each applicant and their paperwork. Because of the tedium, standing out and creating a fresh spin on resumes and CVs has become popular. Additionally, making a creative resume can be fun for both the applicant and the employer, as it spices up the monotony of the job hunt and adds a much-needed element of fun.

My name is Andy Morris and I’m a recent design graduate from the University of South Wales who enlivened my job applications with a unique CV in the form of a LEGO minifigure. I used my design philosophy and experience with toys to create a LEGO minifigure CV that sets me apart from my peers.

President Flip Flops: Moving back-and-forth through tweets

Honestly, I don’t care if this is a product worth buying for utilitarian purposes or whether this company will be successful; I just love the idea.

The President Flip Flops is “a lighthearted poke at the political flip flops the President makes on Twitter,” available for purchase.

What I enjoy the most, is that the name itself is very suited for its function.

NICKEL-AND-DIMING ON THE CHARGING CAPABILITIES OF THE iPHONE X

An interesting titbit from the iPhone X tech specs page (also applies to the iPhone 8):

Regarding the battery:

Built-in rechargeable lithium-ion battery

Wireless charging (works with Qi chargers)

Charging via USB to computer system or power adapter

Fast-charge capable

And what is supplied in the box:

iPhone with iOS 11

EarPods with Lightning Connector

Lightning to 3.5 mm Headphone Jack Adapter

Lightning to USB Cable

USB Power Adapter

The iPhone X may be marketed as from “the future,” but in truth Apple has been pushing the boundaries of tech since a while now. The iPhone 7 omitted the headphone jack to some criticism, while now the entire MacBook line-up features only USB Type-C ports. It doesn’t matter which side of the fence you sit on, Apple is a design-centric company and in design, you have to make decisions. Maybe we aren’t there for a wireless and single-port-rule-all world yet, but that is definitely where we are headed.

What however there is no excuse for, is, delivering a compromised experience for what are arguably the most expensive tech products available.

The iPhone 7 may have shipped with a headphone adapter, but it omitted something more important, a 12-watt charger. It was capable of charging faster [not to be confused with fast charge] but most people are unaware, and most people are not going to purchase an additional brick, even if it’s a fraction of the phone itself.

The 2016 and later entire MacBook line; did not come bundled with the standard $19 power extension accessory bundled before, despite having a 15% or so higher price.

This year’s iPad Pros; ship with a 12-watt charger, capable of fast charging [which consists of boosting a device from 0 – 50% in significantly shorter period before normal speeds resume) with a 29-watt or higher USB-C output brick.

This moment’s iPhones 8 and X; capable of fast charging as well with a similar brick. Added to this, wireless charging. Let’s add something else too; it still ships with a lighting to USB-A cable.

The iPhone 8 starts at a $50 higher price than the 7 (albeit with little more storage). The iPhone X starts at $999.

$999 is the price for a phone ahead of its time, but it doesn’t get you wireless sound or connectivity inside the box. That’s extra.

Connectivity to your USB-C type MacBook? Extra.

Wired charging at 12-watt speeds? Extra. Or fast-charging (which is genuinely useful) at 29-watts? Extra.

$999 might be a psychological price-point to meet, but in all senses, I’d rather charge $1049 and give the best version of the charging accessories inside the box.

Hurricane Irma strips the Carribean islands of its greenery

Satellite images published via NASA:

Hurricane Irma churned across the Atlantic Ocean in September 2017, battering several Caribbean islands before moving on to the Florida Keys and the U.S. mainland. As the clouds cleared over places like the Virgin Islands, the destruction became obvious even from space.

These natural-color images, captured by the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat 8 satellite, show some of Irma’s effect on the British and U.S. Virgin Islands. The views were acquired on August 25 and September 10, 2017, before and after the storm passed. 

The most obvious change is the widespread browning of the landscape. There are a number of possible reasons for this. Lush green tropical vegetation can be ripped away by a storm’s strong winds, leaving the satellite with a view of more bare ground. Also, salt spray whipped up by the hurricane can coat and desiccate leaves while they are still on the trees.

Irma passed the northernmost Virgin Islands on the afternoon of September 6. At the time, Irma was a category 5 storm with maximum sustained winds of 185 miles (295 kilometers) per hour. According to news reports, the islands saw “significant devastation.”

Newly processed photos of Jupiter taken by NASA’s Juno probe

Via Kottke:

Seán Doran shared some recently processed photos of Jupiter that he worked on with Gerald Eichstädt. The photos were taken by NASA’s Juno probe on a recent pass by the planet. These are like Impressionist paintings…you could spend hours staring at the whirls & whorls and never find your way out. There are more images of Jupiter in Doran’s Flickr album, including this high-resolution shot that you can download for printing.

An artist enlivens the city with his whimsical shadow artworks

Via Design You Trust:

Damon Belanger, a local artist from San Carlos, created the stencil designs for his latest art project at his home before heading to downtown Redwood City where he draws it out in chalk and paints the design on the sidewalk. A dark gray paint gives the illusion of a strange shadow attached to everyday objects. A parking meter’s shadow becomes a monkey’s hangout or bike racks begin sprouting flowers.

The artwork has caused many people to do a double take because at first glance the shadows seem to blend in well with everyday life. Beth recalled seeing a father and daughter walking down the street and while the father didn’t notice anything, the daughter spotted the flower shadows on the sidewalk.

How to use your cell phone flashlight for dramatic night photography

Frank Myrland, writing for Digital Photography School:

Whether you’ve packed your camera bag light or are simply looking for a creative way to make a picture work in extremely dark conditions, your mobile phone flashlight is a surprisingly capable and adaptable lighting tool.

Directional light is often what makes or breaks a photo. This isn’t just for photographers using flash. Natural light photographers can spend years learning how to properly position their models in relation to the sun and natural reflectors in order to create pleasing lighting on the subject.

Using a cell phone flashlight allows you to bring the light on your model in from an angle, which can be used to add dimension, enhance textures and create a sense of drama.

Pretty amazing results from the only tool you have with you at all times; head up to the link for the full tutorial.

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